The city of Dublin has so many attraction and sights to offer to visitors. We’ve hand-picked a few lesser known tours and experiences that we think are essential. 

 

1. Abbey Theatre Backstage Tour

If you have ever been curious about the world of actors, costumes and theatre then you must take the Abbey Theatre Backstage tour. The Abbey is Ireland’s National Theatre and host to some of the best plays Ireland has to offer. This tour will show you the inner-workings of a current production, enlighten you to the Abbey’s culturally significant past and show you their extensive portrait collection.

 

2. Windmill Lane Studios

Dublins legendary recording studio is now open to visitors. You can see first hand the place where many classic songs and bands have been recorded, most notable being U2 and their masterpiece “The Joshua Tree” was recorded here, as well as music by The Rolling Stones, Kate Bush, The Cranberries, Hozier, Van Morrison, Sinead O’Connor, Metallica, Riverdance, Def Leppard, Lady Gaga and many more. Using audio-visual technology and intuitive storytelling, this tour is the first of it’s kind in Ireland.

 

3. The Guinness Taproom

Yes you’ve heard about the Storehouse, but have you heard of Guinness’s experimental taproom? The Taproom is where you can try Guinness’s cutting edge experiments in brewing, like the Willy Wonka Chocolate Factory for beer! Don’t worry, they also serve food to go with these delicious beers.

 

4. Aviva and Croke Park Stadium Tours

Dublin has 2 major sports stadiums, one north and one south of the River Liffey. They’re quite hard to miss, but what you might have missed is that you can take tours of these historic stadiums. The Aviva Stadium dates back to 1872, and a tour includes a walk around the changing rooms, interactive exhibits and encompassing views of surrounding Dublin. The Croke Park Skyline Tour includes a rooftop walkway, which is the highest viewing point of the city. From here you can see a majority of the city major landmarks, just make sure you bring your binoculars.

 

 

5. Artisan Brew Academy

It’s well known that the Irish are skilled brewers and distillers, but have you ever thought about developing your own brewing skills? You need look no further than the Artisan Brew Academy. Located in the heart of the Liberties, Dublin’s famous distillery and brewing district, the Artisan Brew Academy teaches you everything you need to know to start making your own home-brews. They will take you through the entire process, from ingredients to fermentation and enable you to take home your own signature beer or wine.

 

 

6. Georgian House Party at the Little Museum of Dublin

The Little Museum of Dublin has quickly become a favourite spot for locals to learn more about their city in a quirky and cosy Georgian building. However our favourite way to experience the museum is the laid-back atmosphere of their Georgian House Party. On a Friday evening they host an informal gathering where you will learn all the museum has to teach you, as well as enjoying wine, amusing stories and the good cheer.

 

 

7. Dublin Street Art Tour

Google will tell you all the good art to be found in Dublin is found in galleries, well we say different! Dublin has seen a rise in Street Art, the city’s face is ever changing. Take a walking tour of Dublin with a guide where they will show you all the works of art that chose the city walls as their canvas. Works by Subset, James Early, Conor Harrington and more can be found hidden down alleyways or on the back of buildings. 

8. Seamus Heaney: ‘Listen Now Again’ Exhibition

This project run by The National Library of Ireland in partnership with the bank of Ireland, is a love-letter to the great poets work. It features many of Heaney’s original manuscripts, letters, unpublished works, diary entries, photographs, personal belongings including a portrait by Louis le Brocquy and a lamp of Heaney’s once owned by W.B Yeats as well as interactive displays and a feature wall where visitors can write messages. The exhibit will be open until 2021.

 

9. The River Liffey Ferry

Dublin’s historic Liffey Ferry No. 11 was once a common site on the Liffey, ferrying passengers across the river until it was decommissioned in 1984 when the new East Link Bridge opened.   The Ferry played a vital link for Docklands Communities transporting people to work, school and to loved ones and family members living of the other side of the river. The Ferry service dates back to 1665 when it was given a Royal Charter by King Charles II and went on  to last more than 300 years. Now it has been reinstated, ferrying passengers across for €2, which goes to help fund the Irish Nautical Trust who educate safe maritime practices. It’s a short but unique experience in the city.

 

10. Jewish Tour of Dublin

Ireland’s Jewish history dates back to the 11th Century. The first synagogue in Dublin was built in the 1600s, and though a tiny community, it’s service to the nation of Ireland has been way out of proportion to its size.Take a walking tour of Dublin to see all the significant Jewish sights and the Irish Jewish Museum which is just around the corner from the birthplace of President Hertzog.

 

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